The Professional’s Toolkit

He was lying to my face about his involvement in the conflict. The digging discovered yesterday posed no threat to the venue. The company was told to pay $500 million in patent trial. At the risk of oversimplification, these media one-liners speak volumes about the journalist’s tool kit. The statements stem from six interrogative words … Continued

Portrait of an Effective Teacher

I’m just not into James Joyce.  I never managed to read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. I’m told it’s an awakening and rebellion against religious conventions—not the stuff of dramatic import that I would find intriguing. One basic Joyce theme does ring true, the notion that an epiphany can dramatically alter … Continued

The Power of Case Studies

Everyone loves a good story. Infusing case studies with storytelling, not just factual issues, provides students with opportunities to solve problems applying creative and critical thinking skills. We never want to dictate understandings. We want students, different as they may be, to understand meaning, draw inferences, and interpret information to discover universal experiences and truths. … Continued

A Teacher’s Lullaby

Teaching puts me to sleep. Yes, it’s true. After 40 years on the education scene, I still find, beyond everything that is professionally reasonable, teaching sessions at workshops, conferences, and academia that are more potent than the strongest off-the-counter sleeping pill. One more yawn and my jawbones will veer off in separate directions. In elementary … Continued

Yes We Can

I remember during a visit to the Vatican, our tour guide proclaimed that Michelangelo saw a statue in every block of marble. Also, I remember reading a statement by Oliver Wendell Holmes asserting, “The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions.” Indeed, I remember my very old martial arts instructor … Continued

Uncommon Common Sense

“Yesterday I died.” It’s a common feeling among students subjected to communication and teaching styles based on ‘common sense’. “First tell them what you’re going to say. Then, tell them. In the end, tell them what you said, again.” This is sheer nonsense. I doubt this recommended, repetitive rubbish was ever true. It continues to … Continued

Presenters Quiver

Standing in front of an audience and giving a speech makes some presenters quiver. It evokes the closest thing to cardiac arrest. Solution? Don’t do it. But… it’s part of my job description as a learning professional. It’s required to ensure learners receive the needed training and preparation for their eventual jobs. Actually, it’s not. … Continued

The Professional’s Toolkit

He was lying to my face about his involvement in the conflict. The digging discovered yesterday posed no threat to the venue. And one more, The company was told to pay $500 million in patent trial. At the risk of oversimplification, these media one-liners speak volumes about the journalist’s tool kit. The statements stem from … Continued

Just don’t marry the snake

I hate snakes. They creep me out. I don’t trust them. They stir me with repulsion. No amount of self-composure is going to alter what I feel. Time is not a factor where snakes are involved. If I’m honest with myself, I really have to admit that I don’t know snakes. I don’t know their … Continued

Is WHO on first?

“Enough already. Such a deluge of questions. You’re burying me with so many imponderables!” Students, rest assured that your instructor is not trying to frustrate you. These folks have your best interest at heart and are simply trying to engage you in productive learning experiences. Questions make you think. An abundance of probing questions make … Continued